*Update* I’ve had some personal struggles lately and with the transition from the school environment to back home, I’ve been unable to update this page at all. For those who constantly remind me and support me in this, I thank you and appreciate you. It makes me so happy knowing that I have readers out there whether you come on a regular basis or have dropped by just once. Also, through the kindness of a great friend of mine, he purchased my domain for me so the plan is to get the site running and eventually redirect you guys to my own personally owned site (though I will always love wordpress for giving me a place to start this up) Can’t wait! :)

I’ve eaten short ribs in many variations in the past. When I came across this recipe  and saw the delicious photo, I put it into my ever-growing list of recipes that I want to try. While on a grocery run with the family, I encountered some short ribs and instantly remembered this recipe and decided it was time to give it a try. I hadn’t really mentioned to anyone in my family that I was making it they didn’t get excited for it until make later into the cooking process.

The experience was an interesting one as I don’t often ‘braise’ any type of meat, new cooking method for me to try out but of course I love experimenting. I luckily had all the other ingredients at home waiting for me and I set out one weekend to make this long but tasty meal.

Recipe adapted from Simply Recipes

Ingredients :


  • 12 beef short ribs, bone-in
  • Salt (minimal) and freshly ground pepper
  • 1/4 cup grapeseed oil or olive oil
  • 1 yellow onion, peeled and chopped
  • 1 stalk celery, chopped
  • 1 carrot, peeled and chopped
  • 1 750-ml bottle good dry red wine
  • 6 cups veal stock (can substitute for beef stock)

Instructions:

1 Preheat oven to 350°F. Season ribs to taste with the salt and pepper. Heat oil in a large, heavy bottomed ovenproof pan over high heat. Add ribs and brown on all sides. Work in batches if you need to so that the ribs don’t get crowded (this will help with browning).

2 Transfer ribs to a plate. Pour off excess fat. Add the onions, celery, and carrots to the pan and sauté, stirring often, until lightly browned, about 5 minutes. Remove the vegetables from the pan, set aside. Then add the wine to the pan, deglazing the pan, scraping off any browned bits from the bottom of the pan. Reduce the wine by three-quarters until thick and slightly syrupy, about 15 minutes.

3 Return the ribs to the pan, add the veal stock and enough water to cover the ribs. Bring to a boil, cover with foil, and place in the oven. Braise, cooking in the oven, until the meat is fork-tender, 2 to 2 1/2 hours. During the last 1/2 hour of cooking, add back in the vegetables. Allow the ribs to cool in the liquid, then cover and refrigerate overnight.

4 The next day, remove the excess fat that has solidified at the top from the overnight chilling. Place the pan with the ribs and cooking liquid over medium heat, uncovered. Cook until the liquid has reduced by three-quarters, about 1 hour. Continue to cook, spooning the sauce over the ribs, until the sauce is thick and ribs are glazed. Take care not to burn the glaze; move the ribs around in the pan to keep them from burning.

Review:

You can serve this over rice. The beef ribs were so tender they were falling off the bone. The flavours of the wine had infused into the meat and the vegetables. Because the process involved removing all the excess fat, the meat and glaze were  not greasy or oily. The vegetables were not mushy but tender like the meat. I chopped the vegetables however I wanted but I would recommend the bigger the pieces, the less likely that they will turn to mush. It is a long process but very well worth it. In reality you aren’t spending too much time cooking and the added step only works to your benefit to eliminate unwanted fat. I used beef stock in my recipe as veal stock isn’t as easily accessible. The only downside was that I added a bit too much salt during the cooking process and after braising the meat for so long, the saltiness only intensified so I would recommend easing up on seasoning and then tasting the final product before adding more. Alway better to have less than more so that you add to it later. I remember the smell of this while cooking was divine and filled the house. My family and I enjoyed the different meal experience. Give it a try for yourself and as always, Happy Eating! :)


Advertisements